Debra Prinzing

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SLOW FLOWERS: Week 4

February 13th, 2013

“A nest for my orchids”

A classic indoor plant, each cymbidium stem holds several blooms – the antidote to a dreary winter day.

A classic indoor plant, each cymbidium stem holds several blooms – the antidote to a dreary winter day.

Ingredients:

20-30 cut stems colored twig dogwood (Cornus sericea), grown by Oregon Coastal Flowers
1 spray Cymbidium Sleeping Dream ‘Castle’, grown by Peterkort Roses
Vase:
7-inch tall x 4-inch square clear glass vase
4-inch tall x 5-inch long x 3-inch wide clear glass vase

orchid_detail_042

From the Farmer
Orchids as cut flowers: According to Sandra Peterkort Laubenthal, whose family grows roses, lilies and orchids in greenhouses outside of Portland, Oregon, cymbidiums can be displayed as a flower-studded stem or cut individually off the stem for floating or inserting in floral tubes. It’s hard to know, however, how fresh the flower is. “What makes the most difference is if they are cut right after blooming,” Sandra says. “Look at the lip to see if it has turned pink or is otherwise discolored. This is an indication that the flower has been pollinated by an insect – and that dramatically shortens the cymbidium’s lifespan.”
NOTE: Each Sunday of this year, I will post my photographs, “recipe” and tip for that week’s floral arrangement, created for my new book, Slow Flowers. Enjoy the floral journey through 52 weeks of the year~

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